Emily Rubenstein, LMFT

License #124000 (CA)
Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist
Individual Therapy, Group Therapy, Brainspotting
Anxiety, Career/Academic Stress, Eating Disorders, Life Transitions, Women’s Issues
Non-directive (Humanistic), Trauma Focused
Mornings, Around Noon, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday
Taking new clients
Telehealth, In-person
English
Ethera Irvine
Out of Pocket, Superbill
$200 per 50-minute session

Meet Emily Rubenstein

How have your personal experiences helped your work with your clients?

There are a lot of ways my personal experiences have contributed to my work and why I do what I do, but something that really stands out to me is all the ways in which therapists were not helpful to me when I was most in need. I feel driven by the desire to show up for my clients in the way that I wish therapists had shown up for me in the past. This leads me to prioritize authenticity and human connection in the room. I had the “blank-slate” therapists when I just needed someone to be human with me and for that reason, I always make sure I bring my whole human self into my work.

 

What does a typical session with you look like?

I consider myself a very humanistic and collaborative therapist. I prioritize client autonomy and client-lead goals. Each session begins with an invitation for the client to bring their own focus into session. If we identified a preferred starting point at the conclusion of a previous session, I will mention that is where we left off to see if it still feels fitting to pick up there. The beauty of therapy is the flexibility of bringing different parts and needs into the room. That means that one week, we may continue where we left off in an important process, another we may focus on skill-building, and the next may be a place to blow off steam from a frustrating day at work. The space belongs to you to make it what you need.

 

Is there an example from your daily life where you practice what you preach?

I use a lot of mindfulness skills in my practice. Mindfulness has been a helpful tool for me in my therapeutic journey and an ongoing exercise that I work to practice a little each day. When I teach mindfulness to my clients, I recommit myself to practicing the tools that I teach and use it as an opportunity to identify where I may have put these tools on the backburner.

If you hadn’t become a therapist, what profession would you have chosen and why?

I started undergrad as a Musical Theatre major and would not hesitate to take a role on stage if the opportunity presented itself… (Acting resume available upon request. Kidding! Kind of…)

 

How do you approach the stigma surrounding mental health and therapy?

This may sound counterintuitive as a therapist, but I work to be mindful of not using the phrase “mental health.” I believe that our use of this term is, in and of itself, stigmatizing. To identify health as “mental” separates it from the physical, which cannot be done. The entire human experience exists within our physical body and our emotional and physical experiences are directly tied to one another. I will talk about our health, sometimes specifying “brain” or “emotional” health (if it’s necessary to clarify), in order to encourage a language shift that reinforces that mental health simply: health.

 

For more information, please visit www.talkwithem.com

 

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Emily Rubenstein?

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Therapy Styles

Short Term (Solution-focused, etc.) 
Ideal for those who are coming in with a specific problem they’d like to address and gain clarity on. Typically, short term therapies are present focused and do not dive deep into your past.

Structured
Structured therapies are goal and progress oriented. Therapists may incorporate psychoeducation and a specific “curriculum.” In order to stay on track, therapists may provide worksheets and homework.

Insight-oriented (Psychodynamic, Existential, etc.) 
Exploring the past and making connections to present issues can help clients gain insight. Getting to the root of the issue and finding deeper self-awareness can help with long-term change.

Non-directive (Humanistic, Person-centered, etc.)
Going with the flow and seeing where it leads.

Behavioral (CBT, DBT, etc.)
Focuses on changing potentially unhealthy or self-destructive behaviors by addressing problematic thought patterns and specific providing coping skills.

Trauma Focused (EMDR, TF-CBT, etc.)
Recognizing the connection between trauma experiences and your emotional and behavioral responses, trauma focused therapy seeks to help you heal from traumas.